The new Sensaphone® Pressure Sensor is ideal for measuring and detecting loss of boiler pressure in hot water systems at large facilities including hotels, schools, hospitals, universities and housing communities.

The Sensaphone Pressure Sensor monitors for pump problems such as clogged intake or discharge lines, loss of suction or a burst pipe. The sensor sends real-time pressure data to the Sensaphone system for data acquisition and alarming. Early notification of pressure failures allows HVAC personnel to act quickly to prevent pump motor overheating and facility damage.

The Sensaphone Pressure Sensor monitors circulation pumps and general pressure of the hot water systems from the street side into the facility. The sensor has a pressure measuring range of 0 to 200 psi, cable length of 6.6 feet (2 meters) and operates in temperatures from -40 F to 194F (-40C to 90C).

“With this new sensor, facility managers and HVAC operators don’t have to worry about under- or over-pressure fluctuations that can cause catastrophic damage if not caught in time,” said Rob Fusco, technical support and service manager at Sensaphone. “When the sensor detects a problem, it notifies users so they can take fast corrective action.”

In addition to HVAC applications, commercial growers and greenhouse operators use the Sensaphone Pressure Sensor to monitor pressure in irrigation, sprinkler and mister systems. Pressure variations can suggest broken or obstructed pumps, pipes, valves and filters. Immediate notification of irrigation system problems can prevent severe over- or under-watering of field crops and nursery plants and save valuable inventory. 

Sensaphone offers a comprehensive line of remote monitoring products that safeguard valuable assets by tracking critical environmental data such as temperature, humidity and power failures. Sensaphone products provide alerts and proactive monitoring data to homeowners and facility managers in many areas including telecommunications, oil and gas, water and wastewater, HVACR, agriculture, healthcare, data centers and greenhouses.